Friday, February 24, 2012

Restaurant Equipment

 

Restaurant Equipment

Planning to buy restaurant equipment? Here are some tips for you to get the most value for your investment. The first and the foremost goal is to buy kitchen equipment that will meet your various food preparation and cooking demands with ease. There are a broad selection of restaurant supplies and equipment options such as ovens, steamers, toasters, and broilers available for your food service kitchen. From the cutlery you select to the refrigerated equipment you choose, your restaurant equipment is intended to serve its purpose and not give you or your staff any hassle. Here are few questions to ask yourself before you make your restaurant equipment purchase.

 

Have you identified your needs? 

 The first thing is to identify your needs whether you are going to buy the kitchen equipment for domestic purpose or commercial purpose. For example if you are going to start a sandwich shop then it is important to buy at least two commercial grade high volume slicing machines, one for meat and the other one for cheese.

 

Do you have ample space?

It is always important to consider the space for placing the equipment especially when you have a space crunch. It is desirable to choose restaurant supplies depending on your purpose and the amount of space available.

 

Do you know the functionality?

It is better to know the functionalities of the restaurant equipment at the time of purchase in order to avoid discomfort later while handling it. Choose restaurant equipment that is easy to operate and user friendly. Moreover avoid devices that require complex installations.

 

Are you aware of the material and technology used?

Before the purchase, know about the type of material used. Stainless steel appliances and utensils are very popular because it is far more sanitary, more durable, and easy to clean and maintain. Contemporary kitchen gadgets use state-of-the-art technology which allows you to perform culinary tasks relatively faster. Infrared technology is used for the quick production of quality food without oil. There is no risk for cleaning the device because some have self cleaning features that saves water and energy.

 

How about the customer service?

There are many restaurant supply stores that supply the latest restaurant appliances and equipment for restaurant business but ensure that the store you are heading to has the customer service incase you need any clarifications and after purchase queries. The customer service offered by that restaurant supply store is effective, proficient, well-organized, and helpful.

 

 

Have you fixed the budget?

The restaurant equipment you buy should be within the budget. Decide on the amount of money you spend on purchasing the restaurant accessories and devices. Buying restaurant equipment from online restaurant supply store is one of the most effective ways of reducing the cost. Due to lower operating costs and overheads, online stores offer quality kitchen equipment at affordable prices.

 
So, before you make a purchase, be sure that you follow the above tips in so you will get the quality of restaurant equipment you want at a price your comfortable paying. Make a smart investment in the kitchen for your restaurant, hotel, inn or other type of food service establishment and increase your productivity!
 

 

Friday, February 24, 2012

Baked Salmon

 

Baked Smoked Salmon

Baked Smoked Salmon

Baked Smoked Salmon and Roasted Vegetables

This recipe is simple and quick and is also nice and healthy option
for anyone watching those calories. This has become one of my
favourite dishes as its so adaptable and always comes out tasting
great.

 

 

What you need

 

Salmon Fillet (I prefer it partly smoked)
Olive Oil
Salt
Pepper
Lemon
Asparagus, courgette, green beans or Vegetables of your choice

 

 

First you should preheat your oven if needed, set it to around 180 degrees, then you want to place the salmon on some tin foil that will be big enough to hold your fish and your veg when wrapped up.

 

Next score the salmon slightly on the top. Now sprinkle some salt and pepper and a squeeze of lemon on to the fish. You can also sprinkle some pre-mixed herbs and spice mix onto it if you wish. I usually add a little garlic or some italian herb mix too. Salmon is so tasty on its own you can get away with just adding a little seasoning.

 

 

Now you want to add your veg, I prefer asparagus and some courgette and green beans. Slice them up so they are all roughly the same size, in this case we want to keep the veg quite small as the fish won’t take long to cook. Again sprinkle a little salt and pepper to taste. Now curl up the edges slightly on your tin foil and add a few drizzles of olive oil over the top. Now wrap up the edges so it is all wrapped up like a parcel and stick it in the oven. Depending on the size of fish you will want to cook it for around 18minutes, but check the guides on any fish you buy.

 

 

Take out the foil parcel when done, open a corner and drain off any excess oil. The salmon should just be starting to flake off when its done and you should see the colour getting lighter throughout. Place it on a plate and you’re done. You can even do a few at a time in the oven with each persons vegetable preferences in their parcels.

 

 

Gareth is a writer who has a keen interest in food and writes for
Cotswold Fayre who always have fresh great food and are a farm shop wholesaler around the
UK.

 
305 Freshwater Fish Recipes

Thursday, February 23, 2012

Hot Cross Buns

 

Hot Cross Buns

 

Hot cross buns are integral to any Easter celebrations and when it comes to taste there is just nothing like home baking to make a really special bun. Individual ideas may vary in terms of the ingredients that are used and the design that the buns should have, and in the end the finer details obviously come down to personal choice. However, here are a few general points to consider if you are looking into making the perfect hot cross buns this Easter.

 

Currants or no currants

‘Currants of course!’ I hear you cry, but actually one of the first acknowledged recipes for hot cross buns does not use currants. It is claimed that these annual Easter offerings are the descendants of the humble ‘London bun’ – the distinctive iced white fingers that still remain today. At Easter, the currants in the London bun were replaced with candied peel and beaten eggs were added to the mixture to adapt the buns for Good Friday and give them a golden glow underneath the edible cross. One thing that is certain is that hot cross buns should never contain cranberries, even if you are American.

 

 

Should hot cross buns be boozy?

Given the nature of Good Friday as rather a sad occasion there is probably a strong argument for saying that hot cross buns should contain no booze at all. However, this has not stopped recipes being adapted over the years to include alcoholic ingredients and the most popular of these is stout. The stout is poured in to the mixture at the same time as the flour and yeast and then left overnight. The next morning the spices are added in with the eggs, butter and sugar, creating a distinctive dark and malty bun.

 

 

How long until it’s proven?

How long you leave your dough to ‘prove’ (i.e. allowing it to rise) probably depends on how late you leave it to make the buns this year. If you manage to get very organized in advance then you can follow Nigella Lawson’s method of leaving the mixture to prove over night for maximum rising time. If not, then most other recipes will recommend around an hour and a half. In theory, the longer the dough is left to prove, the lighter your buns will be.

 

 

Spice it up?

When it comes to the delicate spicing required in the perfect hot cross bun, again this can often come down to a matter of personal taste. Whilst more traditional recipes will limit the spicing to a couple of teaspoons of ‘mixed spice’ – which you can of course buy in a jar – other recipes will have you infusing the milk with everything from cardamom pods to saffron. When making the decision about spicing really it’s quite simple – if you don’t like the taste of cardamom then stick to the mixed spice.

 

 

How do you eat yours?

Hot cross buns are usually pictured served hot from the oven and oozing with a delicious, thick slab of butter. However, over the years that they have been around, variations have developed on this theme and there are now some pretty wild and wacky ideas for consuming this annual Easter treat. Marmite provides a deliciously salty contrast to the sweetness of the buns, or marmite and peanut butter together is an interesting experience. Again along savoury lines, cream cheese somehow works particularly well with hot cross buns straight from the oven. Alternatively, load yours up with jam and clotted cream for an Easter afternoon tea treat, or for something purely indulgent cover them in chocolate spread.

 

 

Once you know where you stand on these crucial bun baking issues then making the perfect hot cross buns this Easter is easy. Whether you’re infusing with cardamom or sticking to mixed spice, smothering in peanut butter or eating plain and warm from the oven, it’s always a much more satisfying experience to know you have made the buns yourself.

 

 

 

John is a content developer on behalf of Russell Hobbs who enjoys cooking and baking in his spare time. Visit Russell Hobbs for great deals on toasters and coffee machines.

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